Interview of the President of the FDB

Article 10 bis

An interview of the President of the FDB, Bernard Limal, was published in Associations magazine in December. It presents the FDB and its involvements in terms of solidity, transparency and trust of its sponsors.

A second interview of the President of the FDB was published in Gaiamodo’s newsletter of December, entitled “ Biodiversity & Business news” (Study and advice agency on biodiversity and environment). To read the interview, please visit http://www.gaiadomo.com/fr/2012/actu-04122012/ .

Cover page of the interview of Bernard Limal © FDB

Results of PHOTO’s competition

Article 1

As part of its partnership with PHOTO magazine for the 2012 photograph’s competition, the FDB participated in the jury to select and award the winner of the category “Biodiversity”. Paradoxically, we can’t see any fauna or flora on the selected picture but the mankind in the middle of the ford, looking for water: this precious water whose quality and availability are closely related to ecological services held by Biodiversity. This constitutes a different approach to better understand the meaning of “natural resource”.

The winner’s photograph in the category « biodiversity » © Jean-Michel

The endowment fund for biodiversity’s newsletter n°1

news-janv2013-vign
The endowment fund for biodiversity's newsletter n°1
Edito
Results of photo's competition
Gharials rescued by river rangers in Nepal
In Mayotte, the young ambassadors meet the dolphins at last
Release of six chinese alligators
Exceptional observation of white-beaked dolphins
Interview of the President of the FDB
The supporting fund for the communal biodiversity atlas in Valeurs actuelles magazine
Fonds de Dotation pour la Biodiversité

Did you know?

Orchid seeds need a microscopic fungus to germinate. This phenomenon can be considered as a symbiosis. The fungus destroys the very resistant seed coat and feed the seed to help it germinating. Once well developed, the orchid feed back the fungus.

The specie of the month : the Kiwi

The Kiwi is a bird living in New-Zealand. Because of its atrophied wings, it is not able to fly. But this peculiarity is not a handicap since the kiwi doesn’t have natural terrestrial predators, or should we say didn’t have. The introduction of predators such as rats, ferrets, dogs and opossums is responsible of the decline of kiwi populations. The destruction of its forest habitat for agriculture development is also a serious threat for this bird.

There are actually 5 species of Kiwi! They are all threatened with extinction, except the Owen kiwi which has been reintroduced in some small islands without predators.

North island brown Kiwi

A new impetus for Nile crocodile conservation in Niger

The FDB recently started a new partnership with the association COECO, to develop a Nile crocodile conservation project in Niger, notably by strengthening the wild population of Nile crocodile which is very threatened locally.

Last summer, the site of the future crocodile study centre has been precisely identified with local community consultation, on the Karey-Kopto island, on the Niger river. The objective is to make this island a protective zone for crocodile and global biodiversity, ensuring a spillover for village communities, through the development of different activities such as ecotourism, handicraft and fish farming.

The local representative is showing the Island where the project will be implemented (© Christian Noirard, COECO)

n° 15 September-October 2012

news-nov2012-vign
The Endowment Fund for Biodiversity's newsletter
Edito
Mission in Mexico
A new impetus for Nile crocodile conservation in Niger
Modest hatching of the nests in the Everglades
Results of the wildlife inventory of the Deux-Balé nature reserve
Waiting for the sea surveys in Mayotte…
Fonds de Dotation pour la Biodiversité

n° 14 July-August 2012

news-sept2012-vign
The Endowment Fund for Biodiversity's newsletter 14 July - August 2012
Edito
Publication of the Orinoco Crocodile Monograph
Concrete repercussion of the meeting of the Crocodile Specialist Group in manila »
« Valeurs Actuelles » magazine supplement on environment and biodiversity
Biodiversity and culture in Burkina-Faso
New dolphin ambassadors in Mayotte
BAD NEWS FOR BIODIVERSITY
Fonds de Dotation pour la Biodiversité

Did you know?

A magpie (Pica pica) recognize itself in the mirror!

Several individuals of the specie indeed passed the test of “Self-consciousness”: when placed in front of a mirror, the magpie tries to get rid of the red stain the scientist drew previously on its neck.

Bad news for biodiversity

With the recent death of « Lonesome Georges », giant turtle of the Galapagos, it’s the entire specie Geochelone Abingdoni that becomes extinct. This male was the only survivor of the specie. He was discovered in 1972 on Pinta island, while scientists thought the specie had disappeared a long time ago because of whaler hunting in the 18th and 19th century and competition for food resource with introduced species such as goats and pigs. Reproduction attempts, like the introduction of genetically close females in the enclosure of the survivor, had all failed.

Lonesome Georges (© FDB)

Like the African proverb says, an old men who dies is like a library that burns. It’s a little bit like this for turtles.

Specie of the month

The Giant Chinese salamander

The Giant Chinese salamander (Andrias davidianus) is the biggest amphibian in the world: it can be up to 1, 80 m and 65 kg! This animal hunts by night thanks to sensory receptors on the surface of the skin that can detect every water pressure change made by its preys (fishes, crustaceans, small mammals). This salamander breathes with its lungs when it goes up to the surface of the water and with its skin when it goes down in the water. The specie is critically endangered because of poaching (for luxurious meal and Chinese traditional medicine) and because of the deterioration of its habitat (dams, decrease of water quality, deforestation).

Giant Chinese salamander (© Ken Lucas, www.ardea.com)

n°13 – May – June 2012

La lettre du Fonds de Dotation pour la Biodiversité
La lettre du Fonds de Dotation pour la Biodiversité numéro 13 Mai - Juin 2012
Edito
Six new Dolphin projects!
Visit of the Philippine crocodile project
Participation in the Crocodile Specialist Group Meeting
Spotting of the rare Orinoco crocodile
First honey harvest in the Deux-Balé area
Biodiversity News

n° 12 April 2012

new-fr-av-vign

n° 11 Jan-Feb-March 2011

newsletter-j-f-m2012-fr

Did you know it ?

Did you know why African elephant’s ears were so big?

The African elephant uses its ears as a cooling system. They can measure 2 m2 and own a huge blood vessel network. When elephants move they ears, their blood temperature decreases by 5°C !

Species of the month

The wild camel

As what we are commonly taught, the Camel has two bumps whereas the Dromedary has only one. However, these two bumps are surprisingly not full of water but full of fat! They are in fact a precious stock of energy in a low resources desert environment. Moreover, when water is missing, the camel can reduce its sweating and change its body temperature.

The Wild camel (Camelus ferus) is the 8th large mammal most endangered on earth! Only about 600 individuals were left in the wild. In fact, since 2004, the wild camel is known to be a distinct species from the domestic camel (Camelus bactrianus) which is represented by about 2 millions of individuals.

The Wild camel remains in only three habitats of North China and Mongolia. It’s classified as critically endangered. Main threats are hunting, habitat destruction by livestock and hybridisation with domestic camels.

News about worldwide Biodiversity

Good news for Panda ?

A Panda census which has recently started in China is expected to confirm a slight recovery in numbers of one of the world’s most endangered species.

In 2004, the Chinese forest department estimated that 1600 pandas were left in the wild. This two-year survey is the most comprehensive and sophisticated study ever made of the wild population and their habitat. It will cover 3200 square kilometers even though the species distribution is much bigger. The results will not be available until at least 2013, but one senior technical adviser, Wei Fuwen of the Institute of Zoology Chinese Academy of Sciences, was optimistic: ”The number of pandas has definitely increased due to the laws and regulations that have been passed to protect the species and the forests. But it is too early to say how much of a rise there has been”. Even if a small gain is confirmed, the panda is not out of danger particularly because of habitat loss. For further information: http://www.smh.com.au/environment/conservation/census-offers-good-news-for-pandas-20111203-1ocj1.html (Jonathan Watts / December 4, 2011).

n° 10 November-December 2011

newsletter-nov-dec-2011-fr
Fonds de Dotation pour la Biodiversité The protection of the rhinoceros thanks to through the production of alternative crops in Nepal Exceptional observation of a bear  with three cubs in the Pyrenees Continuation of Orinoco crocodile conservation awareness campaign in Colombia Hives to provide sustainable development within the Deux-Balé forest in Burkina-Faso River Rangers training in Chitwan The GECC receives the "Admissible Solidaire" award organized by Grenoble School of Management Species of the month : The Giraffe Follow the movements of nine American crocodiles on the tracking maps of the FDB and of the University of Florida! The FDB establishes a partnership with the Mabuwaya Foundation in the Philippines

Species of the month : the giraffe

The Giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) is a ruminant mammal native to the African savannahs. The name “giraffe” comes from Arabic meaning “beautiful.” The giraffe is singled out by its particularly elongated neck that permits it to feed from trees measuring up to 5.80 m in height.

The last census estimated that between 11,000 and 150,000 individuals of the species remained in the wild compared to one million in the 1990s. The giraffe is hunted for its meat and skin. It is also threatened by habitat destruction.

Currently, the largest populations are found in Kenya, Tanzania and Botswana.

Exceptional observation of a bear with three cubs in the Pyrenees

“A female bear accompanied by her three young cubs was observed and photographed by a hiker in the Ariège department, Sunday, October 9th, 2011.

This observation follows a first sighting in late July in the same area except that on that occasion the presence of only two cubs was confirmed.  It is probable that this is the same female.

Only the collection of genetic material (hair, feces) will determine the sex of the cubs and the identity of the female.

Several adult females have been identified in the region with two of them likely to have given birth in 2011: Hvala (released in 2006) and Pollen (born in Melles in 2007).

The observation of a litter of three cubs in the Pyrenees is an exceptional event … ”

The photographs that were taken, displayed on the above website, “… show animals who appear to be in perfect health, which allows us to be relatively optimistic regarding their survival.”

http://www.paysdelours.com/fr/observation-exceptionnelle-d-une-ourse-avec-3-oursons-dans-les-pyrenees.html?cmp_id=50&news_id=975&vID=249#975

The FDB establishes a partnership with the Mabuwaya Foundation in the Philippines

The Fonds de Dotation pour la Biodiversité has signed a collaboration agreement with the Mabuwaya Foundation in favor of the conservation of the Philippines crocodile (Crocodylus midorensis). The project titled « Cash for Communities Conserving Crocodiles (4Cs) », aims to provide direct payments to the rural communities for protecting crocodiles. The Philippines crocodile is severely threatened from exploitation and unsustainable fishing methods. It is classified as critically endangered according to the IUCN Redlist. To date only about 250 specimens are estimated to remain in the wild, which requires urgent measures to protect the species.

Rare Siamese Crocodiles Hatched in Lao PDR

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110830193857.htm

ScienceDaily (Sep. 1, 2011) — Working with the government of the Laos Public Democratic Republic, the Wildlife Conservation Society has helped to successfully hatch a clutch of 20 Siamese crocodiles, a species threatened across its range by hunting, habitat fragmentation and loss, and other factors.

Classified as Critically Endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, the Siamese crocodile grows up to 10 feet in length. The species has been eliminated from much of its former range through Southeast Asia and parts of Indonesia by overhunting and habitat degradation and loss.

Hatched from eggs taken from the wild and incubated at the Laos Zoo, the baby crocodiles represent a success for a new program that works to save the Siamese crocodile and the wetlands and associated biodiversity of Laos’ Savannakhet Province.

Launched in 2008 as the Crocodile Resource Management Plan, the project uses crocodile conservation as a means of protecting the larger landscape. The first phase of the project focused on surveys of crocodiles, the wetlands where they occur, and the livelihoods of local communities in Savannakhet Province.

The recently hatched eggs are part of the crocodile replenishment phase of the project, where eggs from wild nests are transported to captive settings in order to boost the survivorship of the clutches. The hatchlings will be released as second-year juveniles, when the reptiles are large and robust enough to avoid mortality in the wild.

n° 9 September-October 2011

newsletter-sept-oct-2011-fr

Species Affected by Climate Change: To Shift or Not to Shift?

“Relocating species threatened by climate change is a radical and hotly debated strategy for maintaining biodiversity. In a paper published August 10 in the journal Nature Climate Change, researchers from CSIRO, University of Queensland and United States Geological Survey present a pragmatic decision framework for determining when, if ever, to move species in the face of climate change…]

[…Managed relocation, also known as assisted colonization, of species involves moving plants or animals from an area that is, or will become, untenable because of climate change, to areas where there are more suitable climatic conditions but in which the plants or animals have not occurred previously.

"While the virtues of managed relocation of species are being debated by the scientific community, the reality is that it is already occurring... - Dr. McDonald-Madden, researcher at the CSIRO and the University of Queensland...]

[…”Without relocating species we are destined to lose some of our most important and iconic wildlife, but at the end of the day we also need viable ecosystems into which we can move species… – CSIRO researcher Dr. Tara Martin”

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110810093843.htm

ScienceDaily (Aug. 9, 2011)

Tree Growth and Fecundity Affected More by Climate Change Than Previously Thought

An 18-year study of 27,000 individual trees from over 40 different species by the National Science Foundation (NSF) found that tree growth and fecundity were more sensitive to climate change than previously thought.

The study, published on April 5th 2011 in the journal Global Change Biology, identified earlier spring warming as one of several factors that affect tree reproduction and growth. They also showed summer drought as an important but overlooked risk factor for tree survival, and that species in four types of trees–pine, elm, beech, and magnolia–are especially vulnerable to climate change.

In conclusion, if all trees of a species grew in the same conditions  (same light, moisture, soil and competition for resources), species-wide spatial analysis might suffice. Scientists wouldn’t therefore need to worry about demographic variables and risk factors cannot accurately predict biodiversity loss due to climate change.

ScienceDaily (Apr. 4, 2011) - http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110404111050.htm

Lacoste mission in China

From May 17th to 22nd, the FDB team traveled with Michel Lacoste to China to participate in the experimental reintroduction of six Chinese alligators, an initiative carried out by Dr.  Wu’s research team at Anhui Normal University. The release of these six specimens follows on from  the first experimental reintroductions that were carried out in 2006. The localisation of each of the released individuals can be monitored several times a day thanks to VHF equipment, thus allowing for an excellent understanding of the released individuals´ movements and use of space.

Only 120 alligators now remain in the wild, making of this species (endemic to China) one of the rarest crocodile species in the wild. For the reconstitution of the population, the monitoring of the gene pool of the species by the several breeding centers has allowed for  the selection of individuals most capable of generating  the maximum  population diversity.

At the same time, major wetland restoration projects in the region have made possible the reintroduction of the species into the wild.

The latest news from the Chinese alligator program can be found on the FDB´s website: www.fdbiodiversite.org

n° 8 July-August 2011

newsletter-juillet-aout-en

Tree Growth and Fecundity Affected More by Climate Change Than Previously Thought

Newsletter FR Mai_juin_img_27

ScienceDaily (Apr. 4, 2011)

An 18-year study of 27,000 individual trees from over 40 different species by the National Science Foundation (NSF) found that tree growth and fecundity were more sensitive to climate change than previously thought.

The study, published on April 5th 2011 in the journal Global Change Biology, identified earlier spring warming as one of several factors that affect tree reproduction and growth. They also showed summer drought as an important but overlooked risk factor for tree survival, and that species in four types of trees–pine, elm, beech, and magnolia–are especially vulnerable to climate change.

In conclusion, if all trees of a species grew in the same conditions  (same light, moisture, soil and competition for resources), species-wide spatial analysis might suffice. Scientists wouldn’t therefore need to worry about demographic variables and risk factors cannot accurately predict biodiversity loss due to climate change.

n° 7 May-June 2011

newsletter-mai-juin-en

n° 6 April 2011

newsletter-avril-en

“Save Your Logo” tracking the movements of Crocodiles and Alligators

Crocodile américain

Lacoste, the French clothing company with the crocodile logo, is supporting some of our work in the Everglades via “Save Your Logo,” a nonprofit program that coordinates corporate funding for wildlife conservation and research. This project complements our ongoing alligator and crocodile monitoring program which examines patterns of movement and habitat use in Everglades National Park estuaries.

We are outfitting crocodiles and alligators with GPS/Satellite/VHF telemetry units, which provide daily locations and transmit them to the Argos satellite. We download these location data into a geographic information system to create interactive maps like the one you see below. Over the course of this project we will add environmental information, such as water levels and salinity, so users can track the movements of animals in relation to environmental conditions. The Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan is expected to improve the health of alligators, crocodiles, and their habitats by restoring hydrology and salinity to more natural conditions. Over time, this spatial analysis will help us better understand how crocodiles and alligators are responding to Everglades restoration.

Click a crocodile icon for more information on the animal including a photo, brief description, and the path it has traveled. Location points are plotted approximately twice a week and color coded by month to illustrate long-term movements. Mouse over location points to show the crocodile’s name and the date it was in that location.

n°5 March 2011

newsletter-mars-2011

The FDB introduces itself to ESCP EUROPE

Newsletter SYL Fev FR_4_Page_1_Image_0016

The Fonds de dotation pour la Biodiversité held a conference last January on biodiversity and the perspectives developed in Nagoya for an audience consisting mainly of ESCP Europe students and alumni.

The conference also gave the opportunity to present the Fonds de dotation, its organization and its action programs.

The exchanges that took place during the conference and the get-together that followed demonstrate the interest there is in the issues at stake in matters of biodiversity as well as the desire to contribute towards conservation actions.

A big thank you to the Grenoble Ecole de Management and to ESCP Europe for having shown their support to this initiative. Given the success of the event, the Fonds de dotation will continue its communication programs in the major learning institutions.

From Paris to the Everglades, Lacoste Protects Logo

FDB protège l'aligator avec Lacoste

French company first to connect its animal logo to the real animal

It’s the hissing and thrashing that give you chills.

When the six-foot-long alligator gets mad that a couple of researchers have dragged it out of the swamp and into their airboat, upset that they’ve taped its snout closed, that’s when you’re absolutely certain this primeval beast would snap your arm off in a heartbeat if it could.

“This animal definitely looks healthy, ” says Dr. Frank Mazzotti of the University of Florida. He and his team measure, weigh, tag, and generally inspect the alligator before recording the data and releasing it back into the waters.

It’s part of the team’s ongoing research into Everglades alligators and their cousins, the much more scarce and formerly endangered American crocodiles. They’re both indicator species, which means if their populations are healthy, chances are the Everglades itself is healthy.

“As we are embarking on what’s the world’s largest ecosystem restoraton project,” Mazzotti says, refering to the massive state and federal effort to restore the badly damaged Everglades, “alligators can tell us whether or not we’re succeeding and whether or not it’s a wise investment.”

Valuable research, but it costs money. That’s where Olivier Chiabodo’s grand idea comes into play: why don’t we get companies that have animals in their corporate logos to sponsor research into those animals?

“We just begin one year ago, and Lacoste was the first company that decided to come with us,” says Chiabodo, the founder of Save Your Logo,a non-profit, all-volunteer foundation based in Paris.

Lacoste is the French company famous for its polo shirts sporting the crocodile logo. On one recent night, Chiabodo was out in the Everglades with Mazzotti’s team, getting a first-hand look at the work that Lacoste is sponsoring.

The company is giving the University of Florida’s crocodilian research program $150,000, which Mazzotti’s team will use to attach satellite transmitters to gators and crocs, something they’ve never had the money to do before.

“That will give us even more information on how they’re responding to ecosystem restoration,” Mazzotti said. “With all the talk that there is from top to bottom of decreases in government spending, finding private sources of money is incredibly important to us.”

What does Lacoste get out of this, besides good public relations? Chiabodo says companies should think of research partnerships as an investment in their own symbols.

“If there is no more crocodiles around the world, they have no more brand, so they need to take care about this, but it is the same with many companies, Ferrari for the wild horses, Puma, MSN for the butterfly, there is a lot around the world,” Chiabodo says.

Save Your Logos’  next partner may be French automaker Peugeot, which uses a lion in its logo. But Chiabodo’s already thinking beyond the corporate world. He’s planning to reach out to college and professional sports teams, asking them to pitch in to save their mascots.

The Gators are already on board. How about Dolphins, Panthers, and Marlins?

http://www.saveyourlogo.org/wp-content/uploads/NBC-Miami-Save-Your-Logo-Lacoste.flv

Find on Miami NBC site, post From Paris to the Everglades, Lacoste Protects Logo.

n°4 Februar 2011

newsletter-fevrier-2011

Un rapace protégé

magazine rustica-24032010

L’appel Save your logo (sauver votre logo), lancé par le Fonds pour I environnement mondial et l’Union internationale pour la conservation de la nature (UICN), veut inciter les entreprises et les collectivités qui utilisent l’image d’un animal à mobiliser leurs moyens pour sa conservation.

Quand les animaux nomment

revuedesmarques2

Les marques peuvent avoir pour nom celui de leur créateur, un nom inventé, un prénom, un nom géographique, un acronyme… et parfois celui d’un animal qui peut aussi être le logo. Entrons dans la ménagerie.

Animaux & Propriété Industrielle

2011-03-09_164552

Le domaine animal et celui de la Propriété Industrielle se rencontrent en bien des aspects, tant en matière de marques qu’en matière de brevets d’invention.

Opération recensement des grands dauphins

2011-03-09_155512

Ils sont des centaines à barboter du Cap Fréhel à la Manche, mais ces cétacés restent méconnus • un programme d’étude de trois ans vient d’être lance pour recenser et mieux connaître les grands dauphins sédentarisés du golfe normand-breton.

Recensement des grands dauphins entre Bretagne et Normandie

journal haute marne

Ils sont des centaines à barboter du Cap Fréhel à la Manche en passant par les îles anglo-normandes, mais ces cétacés restent méconnus un programme d’étude de trois ans vient d’être lancé pour recenser et mieux connaître les grands dauphins sédentarisés du golfe normand-breton

Opération recensement des grands dauphins dans le golfe normand-breton

AFP

Ils sont des centaines à barboter du Cap Fréhel à la Manche en passant par les îles anglo-normandes, mais ces cétacés restent méconnus : un programme d’étude de trois ans vient d’être lancé pour recenser et mieux connaître les grands dauphins sédentarisés du golfe normand-breton.

Val d’Isère s’engage pour la protection des aigles

terre de provence

En 1934, quand Charles Diebold, l’un des fondateurs de Val d’Isère, choisit l’aigle comme emblème pour la station, il ignorait que cette espèce pourrait un jour disparaître. Aujourd’hui, dans le cadre du programme “Save Your Logo”, Val d’Isère participe à la protection des aigles, ainsi qu’à la préservation de la biodiversité de la planète.

L’OL veut sauver le lion

Maillot de l'OL

Avec un maillot vierge de toute publicité pour encore quelques mois, Lyon continue d’effectuer des opérations qui font parler. Ainsi, l’OL a fait savoir que dimanche face à Bordeaux, le maillot utilisé porterait le cigle « Save your logo », en référence à une opération destinée soutenir la conservation de la biodiversité, et notamment l’animal symbole du club, le Lion. A Lyon, on n’est jamais mieux servi que par soi-même.

n°3 December – January 2011

newsletter-decembre-2010

Du bien et du moins bien pour les aigles

balade rando

Espèce menacée s’il en est, les aigles de Bonelli ont encore perdu deux unités fin août. Une femelle et son aiglon ont en effet été retrouvés morts dans une pièce d’eau à Puylobier (Bouches-du-Rhône). Deux décès dus à l’absorption par les oiseaux de Carbofuran, une substance chimique dont l’utilisation est pourtant interdite en France depuis 2008 !

n°2 November 2010

newsletter-novembre-2010

n°1 October 2010

newsletter-octobre-2010

Un crocodile au secours des crocos

LE FIGARO

Michel Lacoste est le premier chef d’entreprise français à avoir investi pour sauver l’animal illustrant son logo. En commençant par le gavial du Gange, menacé d’extinction.